SJCC Blog

Osher @ the J: “No-No Boy”

The rediscovery story of John Okada’s 1957 novel “No-No Boy” — how young Asian American writers urged a new audience to recognize the book’s importance and launched its journey from obscurity to canonical work in Asian American literature.

In the early 1970s, Shawn Wong and a group of young Asian American writers discovered the novel, “No-No Boy” by John Okada, in a used bookstore for fifty cents. Originally published in 1957, it had not sold out 15 years later. No one had read it and the author had died believing his novel was rejected and forgotten. Wong will share the rediscovery story of “No-No Boy” — how young Asian American writers urged a new audience to recognize the book’s importance and launched its journey from obscurity to canonical work in Asian American literature.

Speaker: Shawn Wong’s first novel, “Homebase,” won a Washington State Governor’s Writers Day Award and Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award. His second novel, “American Knees,” was made into a film. Among Wong’s six other books is the landmark anthology, “Aiiieeeee! An Anthology of Asian American Writers,” a collection largely credited as the first to showcase Asian American literature. He was featured in the Bill Moyers documentary “Becoming American: The Chinese Experience.” Currently, Wong is a professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Washington where, for the last 35 years, he has taught courses in fiction writing, screenwriting, Asian American literature, Chinese-American history, plus courses in travel writing at the UW campus in Rome, Italy.

*Please feel free to bring your own lunch 

The Osher at the J program series is sponsored by The Summit, A Kline Galland Community.

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Osher @ the J: The Power of Place

Explore how our total environment affects the depth and quality of our lives, and where various artistic movements have sprung up–and why.

Explore how our total environment affects the depth and quality of our lives. We will look into where attendees have lived and traveled to, their hometowns, their job sites, where they live now, and how their specific dwelling place, local neighborhood and greater town or city all contribute deeply to who they are and what they are experiencing at this moment of their life. We will also look at where various artistic movements have sprung up—and why. Attendees will never look at place the same again.  This talk will utilize concepts and writings from Carl Jung, Joseph Campbell, Henry David Thoreau, and the book Getting Back Into Place by Edward S. Casey.

Speaker: Jake is a faculty member of the English Department at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. He has taught English, Journalism, Creative Writing, and classes on World Religions/Spiritual Thought for colleges in Florida and New York.  In addition, Jake was the Co-Founder and Editorial Director of Modern Nomad magazine.  He also leads contemplative retreats at spiritual and religious centers throughout the U.S.  His work as a journalist, student of world religions, and retreat leader has led him to 30 countries and 48 states.  He has had several books published by presses in the U.S. and Canada, including Blue Collar Nomad, Nomadic Devotion, Falling onto the Ground, and A Wandering Train to Now.  Jake has a B.A. in Journalism and a M.A. in Writing and Consciousness Studies. 

*Please feel free to bring your own lunch 

The Osher at the J program series is sponsored by The Summit, A Kline Galland Community.

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Osher at the J: Washington History in 10 Songs

Our state is on the edge: the geographical edge of the U.S., and the cutting edge of music. Join music historian Amanda Wilde as she highlights ten Washington artists who have shaped the music of the region and beyond.

Location: Auditorium

Washington State is on the edge – the geographical edge of the United States and the cutting edge of music. Join radio host and music historian Amanda Wilde as she highlights 10 Washington artists who have shaped the music of the region and beyond. Washington State is on the edge – the geographical edge of the United States and the cutting edge of music. Join radio host and music historian Amanda Wilde as she highlights 10 Washington artists who have shaped the music of the region and beyond.

Speaker: Radio host and producer Amanda Wilde is known for her innovative music programs and eclectic interviews. She was a key figure in the development of cutting-edge Seattle music station KEXP, where she hosted and produced its afternoon drive-time show for 12 years. In 2003 Wilde joined KUOW where she curates the acclaimed music program The Swing Years and Beyond. She continues to produce award-winning radio series and documentaries highlighting music and its role in popular culture. Her work has been recognized with a number of awards, grants, and fellowships for her interviews, documentaries and oral history works. In 2014, Seattle Women in Jazz presented Wilde with the first annual Amanda Wilde Inspire Award for outstanding contributions to the jazz community.

*Please feel free to bring your own lunch 

The Osher at the J program series is sponsored by The Summit, A Kline Galland Community.

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Endless Opportunities

Community-wide educational and social gathering, regardless of age or religious affiliation. In partnership with Temple de Hirsch Sinai, Temple B’nai Torah, Congregation Beth Shalom, and Jewish Family Service.

Location: Auditorium

Cost: Free

Endless Opportunities is a unique community-wide program offered in partnership with Temple B’nai Torah, Congregation Beth Shalom & Jewish Family Service. Events are both educational and social, designed with adults age 60 and wiser. All are welcome regardless of age and/or affiliation.

Feb 11: How Acupuncture Channels Connect Us to Nature
10:30 am-noon

Many have heard about acupuncture, perhaps believing in it or finding themselves skeptical. Whether you have tried it or are afraid of having needles put into your skin, this presentation from Dirk Hein has something for everyone. Learn how the energy pathways of acupuncture that run through our body are not only natural phenomena but are part of a complex system that guides the functions of our organs and essentially keeps us alive. Explore just how deeply our being is connected to nature and our environment. Leave with knowledge on how to live in harmony with the planet enhancing vitality, not just physically but also how to become aware emotionally and mentally of the same natural patterns and processes, which guide our anatomy and physiology, as well as our inner, psychological world.

June 19: Topic TBD – stay tuned!

 

EO’s tzedakah collection for this quarter is non-perishable food items for Hopelink.

For each program, please RSVP to Rabbi Kate Speizer, rsvpEO@tdhs-nw.org  or 206-693-3046.

 

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